The astrology of “The day the music died” – The Best astrology

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On the morning of February 3, 1959, America awoke with terrible news that three of its most popular actors, Buddy Holly, JP "The Big Bopper" Richardson and Ritchie Valens, along with pilot Roger Peterson, had died in a plane crash.

Two of these musicians, J.P. "The Big Bopper" Richardson and Ritchie Valens, "won" their seats and should never be on this plane. The musicians who gave up their seats, Tommy Allsup and Waylon Jennings (Buddy Holly's "Crickets"), had very happy escape options. With Venus opposite Pluto in the map of the crash, the crash victims mostly left relatives: Peterson was newly married, Valens, the youngest victim, had a sweetheart named Donna, and The Big Bopper left his pregnant wife and young child behind. Holly also left behind a pregnant woman who later miscarried due to the shock of hearing about his death via a radio announcement. And yet a young newspaper supplier, Don McLean, immortalized this terrible tragedy "The Day the Music Died" in his classic "American Pie".

As we all know, "Destiny" played a cruel hand that night: the careers of three beloved musicians and one pilot ended tragically. Was that what I meant? We all raise our hands and ask, "What if?" You might think "if only the pilot was more experienced" or "if it hadn't just snowed that night" or "if only the coin had landed tail up" we would still have Buddy Holly, The Big Bopper and Ritchie Valens around. The problem with fate is that trying to understand how it works is like trying to catch a small fish with your bare hands. You chase it for hours, think you catch it accidentally, and then, while deciding on the kill, it swims away so quickly that you have no doubt that it knew you were there all the time. Astrology offers a much better solution.

What can you say if the plane crash caused Mars to connect the malicious third eye from Medusa's severed head? It is fair to say that this conjunction takes place every few years, but this event, this plane crash that is deeply embedded in the American psyche, is not just a random event. In addition, the coroner indicated that the cause of all four deaths was "gross brain trauma" and there is a story. With its sun at 1 degree Sagittarius, Allsup had a close but no cigar opposition. Jennings also had close resistance with his Mercury at 2 degrees Sagittarius. One of the singers, Bobby Vee, who would replace those killed in the crash, also had a near miss with his Mercury at 0 degrees Gemini. However, Valens had Uranus conjunction Algol within one degree and the pilot Roger Peterson had Mars in opposition, which deepened the meaning. Neither Holly nor The Big Bopper had Algol contacts, but maybe it was enough to just sit on the plane that Peterson was flying and be with Valens! DiMucci had no Algol contacts, but his role in the tragedy is somewhat unclear.

When McLeanon's "American Pie" was recorded on May 26, 1971, Saturn was also associated with the Mars / Algol crash, which may mean the song's permanent memory of the tragedy.

Although controversial, Dion DiMucci insists that he was offered a seat on this plane. His version of the event is that Holly has booked plane tickets for the tour headliners. Or in other words for yourself and buddy.

However, when he found out that the plane tickets cost $ 36, DiMucci declined the offer because he grew up listening to his parents quarreling about their rent, which was exactly $ 36 - he thought it was a pleasure that he couldn't afford. Of course, DiMucci had connected the moon to Saturn, so questions of wealth (or lack thereof) could have saved his life. The Big Bopper had "won" DiMucci's seat in a toss.

In the days before the plane crashed, the musicians had traveled on a "Winter Dance Party" tour that started on January 23 and was scheduled to end on February 15, 1959. The idea was that the assembled musicians would play a concert in a different city every night. Although it may sound exciting on paper, the musicians quickly understood that the realities of such a tour were very different: the tour was exhausting. For starters, they drove between the venues in an old bus that crossed the Midwest at random. Only after the tour was booked did the musicians realize that the sheer distance between the venues meant that they would spend a lot of time on this bus. When the temperature reached -32 degrees Celsius, the musicians also found that their bus was very poorly equipped for this purpose - it had broken several times so that they had nothing to do in the middle of nowhere, often in the middle of the night deep snow. Then the bus heater has completely failed. It was so cold on this bus that Carl Bunch, the tour drummer, had to be hospitalized in the second week of the tour because of severe frostbite on his feet. (In his absence, Holly, Valens and DiMucci took turns drumming.) Some of the tour members had developed frenzied colds, including The Big Bopper and Valens. Who can blame someone who is sick for exchanging their ice-cold seats in a dilapidated bus for a 610 km trip for a much shorter trip in a warm airplane with the added benefit of a night in a hotel?

With various reports and the additional problem that history is playing tricks on the human mind, it is difficult to determine who flipped coins. After considering all the conflicting versions of the events, the author assumes that there were two coin flips: one between The Big Bopper and Waylon Jennings and one between Tommy Allsup and Ritchie Valens.

With his offspring in Pisces, Jennings may have been a gentle touch for the suffering. With or without a toss, he took pity on The Big Bopper and lost his place on the plane. The Big Bopper with its moon / Venus conjunction Trigon Mars and its Jupiter-Pluto conjunction as the tip of a T-square between its sun and Uranus was a great personality. We can even guess that he tended to act compulsively and like to take risks.

Interestingly, the MC of the plane crash is against The Big Bopper's MC, which connects the "direction of life" of the two events. It doesn't mean much until you consider that The Big Bopper's unborn son has grown into a man who became curious about rumors about his father's death. The Big Bopper's body had been recovered some distance from the crash site. Could it be possible that The Big Bopper was shot first and then stumbled out of the crash to freeze to death in the snow since Holly's gun had also been found near the crash site?

To answer the question, The Big Bopper's body was exhumed in 2007 when a Neptune-Mercury conjunction went over the Chiron of the crash card and the MC and Transit Chiron of The Big Bopper over the sun of the crash card. It was a time when the "ultimate" question was answered: Was this more of a worldly plane crash or more of a thriller? Little Big Bopper was disappointed to learn that his father had died as a result of a high-speed plane crash. Still, there can't be too many people who meet their fathers for the first time almost fifty years after their death.

Holly had been annoyed that Jennings had given up his seat on the plane after trying so hard to book it. A throwaway comment from Jennings to Holly was the last one they said to each other.

"Well, I hope your old bus freezes," Holly said to Jennings.

"I hope your old plane crashes," he replied.

The night of the crash, Jennings' Mercury had been against Transit Jupiter. He never forgave himself for his careless and irresponsible remark.

In contrast, Valens was afraid of flying. While Valens attended his grandfather's funeral on January 31, 1957, two jet planes collided over his school, killing three of his classmates and injuring over seventy.

On that fateful night on February 2, 1959, he reluctantly asked Allsup whether he would toss a coin, at the encouragement of his management (who feared that Valens would be too ill to perform if he could endure another night on the bus). Allsups Chiron was Valens' Saturn. Even though he, like Jennings, had a tight escape, Allsup could never get past winning the coin flip.

Unfortunately for Roger Peterson, his role as the pilot of the plane that killed The Music means that his fate depends on the fate of the United States. An investigation found that the aircraft crashed due to a pilot error. At 21, however, Peterson was inexperienced and unqualified to fly an airplane using only instruments. It was also known to panic when his visual perceptions were disturbed, making him an extremely poor choice for flying in a snowstorm. In addition to the Algol contacts mentioned above, his Jupiter was connected to the Pluto of the Sibley card.

Of course, we cannot blame Don McLean for the tragedy itself, but we can blame him for having immortalized it in a song. McLean was a 14-year-old newspaper supplier who had the dubious job of delivering the news of the plane crash. The MC of the plane crash is linked to McLean's moon and Chiron in the opposition. "American Pie" was recorded on May 26, 1971 with Uranus, which underwent McLean's Sun and Chiron conjunction. So here we have a young man who relives a childhood tragedy through singing. It's a catchy little number touted as an American classic, no doubt backed by McLean's Mars, highlighted by the Sun of the Sibley card.

McLean's sun is against the Jupiter-Neptune conjunction of recording the song. "American Pie" is full of cryptic cultural references that have been a guesswork since the song's release.

"But what do the lyrics mean?" McLean was asked.

"It means I never have to work again," McLean replied.

Though he has always evaded the meaning of the texts, he confirmed that he will share his longstanding grief over the death of his idol Buddy Holly during the fiftieth anniversary of ...

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